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3Dプリンター住宅 ついに実用化。ゲームチェンジャーになりうる。

3D printed houses are finally in practical use. It could be a game changer.

Since the last time, I have been posting blogs about the technical aspects of 3D printed houses in several parts, but it has finally been put into practical use.

I saw the news.

https://toyokeizai.net/articles/-/702117

Now, compliance with the Building Standards Act, which has been repeatedly mentioned in the 3D printed housing series since last time, has become an issue.

If only the concrete was printed using a 3D printer, as is done overseas, it would result in an unreinforced concrete structure, which would be a structural type that would not be approved by the Building Standards Act.

Well, I heard that 2-person 3D printed houses have finally gone on sale to the general public (in limited numbers), so I immediately checked the news.

I see, by incorporating a steel frame inside, it becomes an SRC structure (steel reinforced concrete structure), making it possible to calculate the structure.

Isn't this a great move? I thought.

In the case of RC structures, a fairly detailed reinforcement arrangement is required to place the reinforcing bars. There are many patterns in which the spine is multi-layered and is placed every 150mm or 100mm. If that happens, the reinforcing bars will get in the way quite a bit, and it can be expected that work efficiency will drop. The printing process would be quite complex, and it would be extremely difficult to assemble prefabricated printed parts on-site using reinforced concrete.

This is because it is almost impossible to join them on site. (Technically, it is necessary to insert chemical anchors, etc., and embed the countless reinforcements protruding from each part precisely so that the strength exceeds the breaking strength of the reinforcing bars, but this is quite complicated and requires on-site work. The quality is very bad and it may be an almost impossible game)

Therefore, by putting a steel frame inside and making it the structural frame, it can be easily joined on site. I see, this is a great idea!

Ah, I see, that's why this serendix50 has a rectangular shape.

This 3D printed house costs 5.5 million yen, which could be a game changer. After all, they can be freed from mortgages, spend the money on other things in their lives, and live their own free lives.

Life is not about mortgages, life is about having fun. This may seem obvious, but it gives rise to the freedom of being able to choose a new lifestyle and life that has been ignored until now.

In the case of SRC* houses, I think they can last for 40 to 50 years if the roof and exterior walls are properly painted and preventive maintenance is carried out properly.

*It is probably not an SRC structure, strictly speaking, but an S structure (steel structure), where all the load is carried by the steel parts. This is just my personal opinion, as I did not inquire about it.

The roof seems to be made of wood, but the roof will need maintenance once every 30 years or so, so if the roof had parts that could be easily replaced, maintenance costs would be low and the house would be highly reliable. I don't think so.

Recently, Japan has become a super-aging society, and there are cases where elderly people are not allowed into rental housing (due to age restrictions). And, year after year, it seems that there are many cases that end up in court, including expensive room cleaning fees, problems with security deposits, and even things that the tenant shouldn't have to pay in the special agreement.

If that's the case, I think it would be a good idea to stop renting and take it easy with a 3D printed house.

The problem may be land. . .

However, isn't it impossible to produce 3D printed houses in Japan other than through the ministerial approval route? That's what I thought, but I didn't realize that there was a surprisingly simple plan to create a structure similar to a steel frame structure. . .

It's very interesting to see how technological innovations like this can make even more commonplace items incredibly cheap.

I look forward to seeing how far it will spread from now on!

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